Federal

  • June 20, 2024

    Housing, Child Care Top Dem. Senators' 2025 Tax Deal Goals

    Senate Democrats plan to prioritize tax policies that will make child care and housing more affordable in the midst of the debate over the extension of the 2017 tax law's expiring provisions in 2025, Senate Finance Committee Chairman Ron Wyden told reporters Thursday.

  • June 20, 2024

    Dickinson Wright Brings On McDermott, Bell Nunnally Attys

    Dickinson Wright PLLC added a pair of new members who include a commercial finance and real estate attorney from Bell Nunnally & Martin LLP based in Austin, Texas, and a tax and incentives attorney from McDermott Will & Emery LLP in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

  • June 20, 2024

    Tax Court Errs In Deeming Loans As Equity, 11th Circ. Told

    A Florida business owner deserves tax deductions on loans his companies made to residential development projects that became worthless during the Great Recession, he told the Eleventh Circuit in a bid to reverse a Tax Court decision that classified the loans as equity.

  • June 20, 2024

    Tax Preparer With $38M In Refunds Cops To S-Corp. Scam

    The owner of a tax preparation business that secured $38 million in federal refunds for customers pled guilty to helping prepare false returns and admitted he required clients to establish empty corporations to lower their tax bills illegally, according to his plea agreement in a California federal court.

  • June 18, 2024

    Ore. To Adopt IRS' Free E-File Program For 2025 Season

    Oregon will participate in the Internal Revenue Service's Direct File free online tax filing program when it returns for the 2025 filing season, the U.S. Department of the Treasury and the IRS announced Tuesday.

  • June 18, 2024

    Corporate Rate Revenue To Decrease After 2025, CBO Says

    Corporate income tax receipts will steadily decrease after 2025 in relation to gross domestic product due to expiration of many of the 2017 tax law's provisions, the Congressional Budget Office said in a report released Tuesday. 

  • June 18, 2024

    Tax Court Admonishes CPA For 'Unbecoming' Tax Positions

    A U.S. Tax Court judge warned a certified public accountant who challenged his $23,000 tax bill that his groundless arguments could cost him a fine, saying in an opinion Tuesday that his tax positions "are unbecoming of a CPA."

  • June 18, 2024

    Mere Mention Of Setbacks Can't Nix Penalties, Tax Court Says

    A Washington man who said he couldn't pay his taxes because he struggled to recover from financial setbacks during the pandemic didn't provide proof of his hardships, the U.S. Tax Court said Tuesday in upholding the government's collection of penalties against him.

  • June 18, 2024

    IRS Drops Two Research Credit Refund Claim Requirements

    Taxpayers submitting refund claims that include the research credit no longer need to furnish the names of people who conducted each research project or the information each person tried to find with claims postmarked as of Tuesday, the Internal Revenue Service announced.

  • June 18, 2024

    Former Tax Atty Hid Pension's $22.6M, Tax Court Says

    A former attorney who promoted himself as an expert in employee stock ownership plans failed to report nearly $22.6 million in income related to his acquisition of a furniture company's overfunded pension plan, the U.S. Tax Court ruled.

  • June 18, 2024

    Life Insurance Fraudster Deserves Tax Penalties, 7th Circ. Told

    The IRS urged the Seventh Circuit to maintain nearly $400,000 in fraud penalties assessed against an Illinois man who pled guilty to falsifying his tax returns as part of a scheme to poison his wife and collect on a $20 million life insurance policy.

  • June 18, 2024

    IRS Guidance Doesn't Perceive Spinoff Abuse, Official Says

    Recent IRS guidance limiting the corporate spinoffs that revenue officials will approve as tax-free ahead of time was designed to reflect the drafters' current views, rather than suggest perceived abuse of these transactions, a U.S. Treasury Department official said Tuesday.

  • June 18, 2024

    AbbVie Says IRS Can't Treat $1.6B Break Fee As Capital Loss

    The Internal Revenue Service cannot reclassify as a capital loss a $1.6 billion payment AbbVie made to an Irish biotechnology company after their failed merger and thereby raise the pharmaceutical giant's tax bill by $572 million, the company's attorneys told the U.S. Tax Court.

  • June 18, 2024

    Applicable Federal Interest Rates To Fall In July

    Applicable federal rates for income tax purposes will decrease in July, the Internal Revenue Service said Tuesday, reporting the first month-to-month drop since February.

  • June 17, 2024

    $2.1B Danish Tax Fraud Defendant Pushes For Separate Trials

    An attorney facing trial alongside his clients on allegations of filing $2.1 billion in fraudulent tax refund claims in Denmark urged a New York federal court to hear his case separately, saying disparate legal arguments could confuse a jury if only one trial is held.

  • June 17, 2024

    IRS Asks Court To Leave Alone Worker Retention Credit Pause

    An Arizona federal court should reject a tax advisory firm's request to lift the IRS' moratorium on processing claims for the pandemic-era employee retention credit, the agency argued, saying the agency should be allowed to continue to run the program as it sees fit.

  • June 17, 2024

    IRS Correctly Assessed Md. Man's Deficiency, Tax Court Says

    There were no genuine disputes of facts with the Internal Revenue Service's determination that a Maryland man had failed to file a return reporting nearly $255,000 in gross income, leading to a tax deficiency of more than $61,000, the U.S. Tax Court ruled Monday.

  • June 17, 2024

    IRS Issues Corp. Bond Monthly Yield Curve Guidance

    The Internal Revenue Service published guidance Monday on the corporate bond monthly yield curve used in calculations for defined benefit plans as well as corresponding segment rates and other related provisions.

  • June 17, 2024

    IRS Didn't Fully Solve All IT Issues, TIGTA Says

    A review of planned corrective actions reported as closed by the Internal Revenue Service's information technology organization found one not fully implemented while another was not fully effective, the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration said Monday.

  • June 17, 2024

    Feds Take Hard Line On Tycoon's Pilots After He Goes Free

    Manhattan federal prosecutors asked a sentencing judge to consider aggravating circumstances for two pilots who allegedly traded on stock tips from U.K. billionaire Joe Lewis, despite not seeking a prison term for the private equity honcho and former soccer club owner.

  • June 17, 2024

    House Bill Seeks Tax Credit For Med Student Supervisors

    Some licensed medical professionals who supervise medical and nursing students during clinical rotations would be entitled to a $1,000 tax credit under a bipartisan bill introduced in the U.S. House.

  • June 17, 2024

    Marathon Ineligible For $247M Fuel Tax Refund, IRS Says

    Energy giant Marathon Petroleum isn't entitled to $247 million in tax refunds for its alternative fuel mixtures because its eligibility for the credits hadn't yet been approved by the Internal Revenue Service when it made the refund request, the agency told an Ohio federal court.

  • June 14, 2024

    Ga. CPA Admits To Role In $1.3B Tax Fraud Scheme

    After a federal jury convicted two of his co-conspirators in a landmark conservation easement tax shelter trial last year, a Georgia accountant who'd previously denied culpability elected to change course Friday and plead guilty to two felony charges.

  • June 14, 2024

    5th Circ. Says Jury Instructions Deeply 'Flawed' In Tax Suit

    A Fifth Circuit panel has found that the jury instructions for a $580,000 tax dispute were "irredeemably flawed," vacating the verdict and handing a loss to a partnership that claimed it had reasonable cause for its tax filing problems due to an employee's mental health issues.

  • June 14, 2024

    US Urges 5th Circ. To Back $2M Tax Bill For Tire Imports

    The Fifth Circuit should overturn a lower court's ruling that a Houston truck company was not an importer responsible for nearly $2 million in excise taxes on tires it bought from a Chinese manufacturer, the U.S. told the Fifth Circuit on Friday.

Featured Stories

  • The Tax Angle: More GOP TCJA Teams, Nonprofit Hospitals

    Stephen K. Cooper

    From a look at efforts by the Republicans on the Senate Finance Committee to prepare for next year's expiration of the 2017 tax overhaul law to a new call for nonprofit hospitals to provide more charity care, here's a peek into a reporter's notebook on a few of the week's developing tax stories.

  • Staffing Hurdles Could Slow Impact Of IRS Audit Boost

    David van den Berg

    The Internal Revenue Service's intended ramping up of enforcement on wealthy people, large corporations and complex partnerships may not have a meaningful impact in the short term because of challenges in hiring and training people to do the work.

  • A Chronology Of The Hunter Biden Investigation

    No Photo Available

    The story behind President Joe Biden's son Hunter Biden's conviction on federal gun charges started with a gun purchase in 2018, was complicated by a laptop repair in 2019, and could bleed into an upcoming trial on federal tax charges in California in September.

Expert Analysis

  • Money, Money, Money: Limiting White Collar Wealth Evidence

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    As courts increasingly recognize that allowing unfettered evidence of wealth could prejudice a jury against a defendant, white collar defense counsel should consider several avenues for excluding visual evidence of a lavish lifestyle at trial, says Jonathan Porter at Husch Blackwell.

  • How Associates Can Build A Professional Image

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    As hybrid work arrangements become the norm in the legal industry, early-career attorneys must be proactive in building and maintaining a professional presence in both physical and digital settings, ensuring that their image aligns with their long-term career goals, say Lana Manganiello at Equinox Strategy Partners and Estelle Winsett at Estelle Winsett Professional Image Consulting.

  • Navigating New Safe Harbor For Domestic Content Tax Credits

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    The U.S. Department of the Treasury’s recent notice simplifying domestic content calculations for certain solar, onshore wind and battery storage projects, which directly acknowledges the difficulty for taxpayers in gathering data to support a domestic content analysis, should make it easier to qualify additional domestic content bonus tax credits, say attorneys at A&O Shearman.

  • Firms Must Rethink How They Train New Lawyers In AI Age

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    As law firms begin to use generative artificial intelligence to complete lower-level legal tasks, they’ll need to consider new ways to train summer associates and early-career attorneys, keeping in mind the five stages of skill acquisition, says Liisa Thomas at Sheppard Mullin.

  • 'Energy Communities' Update May Clarify Tax Credit Eligibility

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    A recent IRS notice that includes updated lists of locations where clean energy projects can qualify for additional tax credits — based 2023 unemployment data and placed-in-service dates — should help provide clarity regarding project eligibility that sponsors and developers need, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • Think Like A Lawyer: Always Be Closing

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    When a lawyer presents their case with the right propulsive structure throughout trial, there is little need for further argument after the close of evidence — and in fact, rehashing it all may test jurors’ patience — so attorneys should consider other strategies for closing arguments, says Luke Andrews at Poole Huffman.

  • Litigation Inspiration: Attys Can Be Heroic Like Olympians

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    Although litigation won’t earn anyone an Olympic medal in Paris this summer, it can be worthy of the same lasting honor if attorneys exercise focused restraint — seeking both their clients’ interests and those of the court — instead of merely pursuing every advantage short of sanctionable conduct, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • Lean Into The 'Great Restoration' To Retain Legal Talent

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    As the “great resignation,” in which employees voluntarily left their jobs in droves, has largely dissipated, legal employers should now work toward the idea of a “great restoration,” adopting strategies to effectively hire, onboard and retain top legal talent, says Molly McGrath at Hiring & Empowering Solutions.

  • How Cannabis Rescheduling May Alter Paraphernalia Imports

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    The Biden administration's recent proposal to loosen federal restrictions on marijuana use raises questions about how U.S. Customs and Border Protection enforcement policies may shift when it comes to enforcing a separate federal ban on marijuana accessory imports, says R. Kevin Williams at Clark Hill.

  • NCAA Settlement May End The NIL Model As We Know It

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    The recent House v. NCAA settlement in California federal court, in which the NCAA agreed to allow schools to directly pay March Madness television revenue to their athletes, may send outside name, image and likeness collectives in-house, says Mike Ingersoll at Womble Bond.

  • Fishing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Atop the list of ways fishing makes me a better lawyer is the relief it offers from the chronic stress of a demanding caseload, but it has also improved my listening skills and patience, and has served as an exceptional setting for building earnest relationships, says Steven DeGeorge​​​​​​​ at Robinson Bradshaw.

  • A Healthier Legal Industry Starts With Emotional Intelligence

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    The legal profession has long been plagued by high rates of mental health issues, in part due to attorneys’ early training and broader societal stereotypes — but developing one’s emotional intelligence is one way to foster positive change, collectively and individually, says attorney Esperanza Franco.

  • To Make Your Legal Writing Clear, Emulate A Master Chef

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    To deliver clear and effective written advocacy, lawyers should follow the model of a fine dining chef — seasoning a foundation of pure facts with punchy descriptors, spicing it up with analogies, refining the recipe and trimming the fat — thus catering to a sophisticated audience of decision-makers, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.