Wage & Hour

  • May 20, 2024

    Minn. Lawmakers OK Pay Rates For Uber, Lyft Drivers

    The Minnesota Legislature passed a bill setting Uber and Lyft drivers' per-mile and per-minute rates, a move that comes after two years of negotiations during which the ride-hailing giants threatened to partially cease offering their services in the state.

  • May 20, 2024

    Boar's Head Can't Untangle Collective In NY Late Pay Suit

    A New York federal judge said Boar's Head can't get reconsideration of an order greenlighting a collective in a late pay suit because the workers in the case supported their claims, but granted the deli meat and cheese company's request to rework the collective definition.

  • May 20, 2024

    Wyndham Wants Out Of Pa. Hotel's Labor Trafficking Case

    Wyndham Hotels & Resorts argued to a federal court Monday it could not be plausibly alleged the chain knew or could have known that its former franchisee at a New Stanton, Pennsylvania, Days Inn was exploiting laborers in a room-for-hire scheme, and so it should be dismissed from the laborers' lawsuit.

  • May 20, 2024

    Agricultural Groups Agree To Toss Claim In H-2A Rule Dispute

    Several Florida-based agricultural groups agreed to toss a claim in their suit challenging the U.S. Department of Labor's rule raising the wages of H-2A agricultural workers, saying while they still believe the allegation is viable, trimming the suit will expedite the litigation.

  • May 20, 2024

    Wash. Pay Range Suits Meet Early Crossroads On Standing

    A federal court's ruling that a job applicant lacked standing to claim an employer violated Washington state's new requirement for employers to include pay ranges in job ads may signal that workers will fare better advancing such claims in state court, attorneys told Law360.

  • May 20, 2024

    United Healthcare Skimped On OT, NM Nurse Says

    United Healthcare misclassified New Mexico-based case manager registered nurses as overtime-exempt even though they have overtime-eligible responsibilities, cheating them out of overtime wages when they work over 40 hours in a week, an ex-nurse said in a complaint in federal court.

  • May 20, 2024

    Rocket Mortgage Agrees To Pay $3.5M To End OT Suit

    Rocket Mortgage agreed to pay out $3.5 million to end a collective suit in Arizona federal court accusing it of failing to pay mortgage brokers for the after-hours work they performed.

  • May 17, 2024

    Trucking Co. Dodges Misclassification Suit, For Now

    A trucking company can temporarily escape claims that it misclassified drivers as independent contractors because the driver lodging the suit failed to show jurisdictional diversity, an Illinois federal judge ruled.

  • May 17, 2024

    Manager Says Travel Co. Fired Her For Promotion Complaints

    A corporate hotel booking service gave lackluster performance reviews to a female national sales manager because she had taken maternity leave and fired her after she raised concerns about being passed over for promotions in favor of a less experienced male co-worker, according to a lawsuit in Colorado federal court.

  • May 17, 2024

    Justices' Arbitration Ruling To Slow Wage Appeals

    Workers will struggle to appeal orders compelling arbitration now that the U.S. Supreme Court has said federal courts must stay cases when claims are sent to arbitration instead of dismissing them, attorneys said. Here, Law360 explores the issue.

  • May 17, 2024

    DOL Fails To Win Order Barring Retaliation On Pork Workers

    A Tennessee federal judge rebuffed a request from the U.S. Department of Labor to bar a pork producer from retaliating against workers providing information about wages, ruling that the department had failed to show that any retaliation had occurred.

  • May 17, 2024

    Industry Emboldened After Justices Galvanize Agency Attacks

    In the year since the U.S. Supreme Court said "extraordinary" and "far-reaching" attacks on administrative enforcers can skip agency tribunals and go straight to federal district court, ambitious challenges to regulatory powers are rapidly gaining traction, and the high court is poised to put them on an even firmer footing.

  • May 17, 2024

    Chicago Tribune Accused Of Underpaying Female, Black Staff

    A group of Chicago Tribune journalists sued the paper and its parent Alden Global Capital in Illinois federal court on Thursday alleging sex and race discrimination that has caused more than 50 reporters and editors to get paid thousands of dollars per year less than their white male colleagues.

  • May 17, 2024

    Delivery Apps Illegally Adding Extra Fees In Seattle, FTC Told

    DoorDash and Uber illegally charge "deceptive and unfair" junk fees to customers to cover the companies' costs to comply with a Seattle law mandating minimum wages for app-based workers, a consumer told the Federal Trade Commission in a complaint.

  • May 17, 2024

    NY Forecast: Doctor's Disability Bias Case Goes To 2nd Circ.

    In the coming week, the Second Circuit will hear a former New York University hospital doctor's bid to revive his suit claiming the hospital discriminated against him on the basis of his disability by denying him work accommodations before firing him. Here, Law360 explores this and other cases on the docket in New York.

  • May 17, 2024

    DOL Wants Early Win In Support Co. Misclassification Suit

    The U.S. Department of Labor urged a Florida federal judge to grant it a pretrial win in its suit accusing a customer support services provider of misclassifying 22,000 workers as independent contractors, saying it's clear the company has near-total control over their work.

  • May 17, 2024

    Calif. Forecast: Justices To Hear If Prop 22 Constitutional

    In the coming week, attorneys should watch for California Supreme Court oral arguments regarding the validity of the Proposition 22 ballot measure from 2020. Here's a look at that case and other labor and employment matters coming up in California.

  • May 17, 2024

    Flight Crews Get Step Closer To In-Flight Nursing Breaks

    The enactment of the Federal Aviation Administration Reauthorization Act paves the way for in-flight crew members to finally have the right to express breast milk by requiring the FAA to address safety concerns head-on, attorneys say.

  • May 17, 2024

    Worker's OT Suit Against Oilfield Co. Pushed To Arbitration

    An oilfield services company can push into arbitration an ex-oil rig worker's unpaid overtime suit, after a Texas federal judge sided with the company, staying the suit pending arbitration.

  • May 16, 2024

    FTC Can't Make Albertsons, Kroger Produce Divestiture Docs

    An administrative law judge on Thursday denied the Federal Trade Commission's "premature" bid to compel Kroger and Albertsons to fork over documents related to negotiations for the companies' expanded divestiture plan amid the commission's in-house challenge to the grocers' merger.

  • May 16, 2024

    EPA Doctor Not A Whistleblower For Slamming Lead Plan

    A former U.S. Environmental Protection Agency pediatrician and epidemiologist who publicly criticized the EPA's plan to reduce lead in drinking water as inadequate is not protected by federal whistleblower law, the Federal Circuit said Thursday.

  • May 16, 2024

    Home Health Co., Aides Settle OT Suit Over Shift Tracking

    A home health care organization and two workers asked an Ohio federal judge Thursday to sign off on a $62,000 settlement resolving claims that the company underpaid overtime wages by separately tracking the day and night shift hours that employees worked in a single week.

  • May 16, 2024

    High Court Decision Requiring A Stay Raises More Questions

    The U.S. Supreme Court's unanimous decision Thursday finding that federal courts must honor a request to stay a case after ordering the dispute into arbitration leaves an important subsequent question unresolved: What happens if neither party requests a stay?

  • May 16, 2024

    Calif. Panel Says Signature Wasn't Rebutted On Arbitral Pact

    A worker failed to show that a signature in an employee handbook containing an arbitration clause wasn't his, a California state appeals court ruled, flipping a trial court's decision that denied a mining company's bid to arbitrate his wage and hour suit.

  • May 16, 2024

    Wis. Appeals Court Undoes Corrections Workers' Wage Class

    A Wisconsin appeals court dissolved a class of state Department of Corrections employees who argued they are owed pay for the time they spent undergoing security checks and walking to and from their assigned work posts, ruling a lower court used an invalid legal theory in certifying the group.

Expert Analysis

  • History Supports 2nd Circ. View Of FAA Transport Exemption

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    In the circuit split over when transport workers are exempt from the Federal Arbitration Act, sparked by the 2022 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Southwest Airlines v. Saxon, the Second Circuit reached a more faithful interpretation — one supported by historical litigation and legislative context, though perhaps arrived at via the wrong route, say Joshua Wesneski and Crystal Weeks at Weil.

  • Employers Need Clarity On FLSA Joint Employer Liability

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    A judicial patchwork of multifactor tests to determine joint employment liability has led to unpredictable results, and only congressional action or enactment of a uniform standard to which courts will consistently defer can give employers the clarity needed to structure their relationships with workers, say attorneys at Seyfarth.

  • Calif. Independent Contractor Lessons From Grubhub Suit

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    California courts have been creating little in the way of clarity when it comes to the employment status of gig workers — and a recent federal court decision in Lawson v. Grubhub illustrates how status may change with the winds of litigation, offering four takeaways for businesses that rely on delivery drivers, say Esra Hudson and Marah Bragdon at Manatt.

  • Labor Collusion Loss Will Shape DOJ's Case Strategy

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    Following the U.S. Department of Justice’s recent loss in United States v. Manahe, tallying its trial score record to 0-3 in labor-related antitrust cases over the past year, defendants can expect that the DOJ will try to exclude defense evidence and argue for more favorable jury instructions, say attorneys at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Staffing Company Considerations Amid PAGA Uncertainty

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    The impending California Supreme Court decision in Adolph v. Uber is expected to affect staffing companies, specifically how the proliferation of nonindividual Private Attorneys General Act claims are handled when the individual claim is compelled to arbitration, say Sarah Kroll-Rosenbaum and Harrison Thorne at Akerman.

  • Eye On Compliance: Joint Employment

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    Madonna Herman at Wilson Elser breaks down the key job conditions that led to a recent National Labor Relations Board finding of joint employment, and explains the similar standard established under California case law — providing a guide for companies that want to minimize liability when relying on temporary and contract workers.

  • How Unions Could Stem Possible Wave Of Calif. PAGA Claims

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    Should the California Supreme Court hold in Adolph v. Uber that the nonindividual portions of Private Attorneys General Act claims survive even after individual claims go to arbitration, employers and unions could both leverage the holding in Oswald v. Murray to stifle the resurgence in representative suits, say attorneys at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Tips For Defending Employee Plaintiff Depositions

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    A plaintiff cannot win their employment case through a good deposition, but they can certainly lose it with a bad one, so an attorney should take steps to make sure the plaintiff does as little damage as possible to their claim, says Preston Satchell at LexisNexis.

  • Predictions On Salary Levels In Proposed DOL Overtime Rule

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    In May, the U.S. Department of Labor is expected to propose new salary thresholds for overtime exemptions for both executive, administrative and professional employees and highly compensated earners under the Fair Labor Standards Act, and based on methodologies used in recent DOL rules, it will likely increase both thresholds, says Stephen Bronars at Edgeworth.

  • Water Cooler Talk: Whistleblowing Insights From 'Dahmer'

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    Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs at Troutman Pepper chat with DS Smith's Josh Burnette about how the show "Dahmer – Monster: The Jeffrey Dahmer Story" provides an extreme example of the perils of ignoring repeat complaints — a lesson employers could apply in the whistleblower context.

  • Retail Employer Strategies For LA Fair Work Week Ordinance

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    The recently effective Los Angeles Fair Work Week Ordinance changes how employers in the retail trade industry approach scheduling and hiring employees, so they should consider creating new standardized forms and procedures to maintain compliance and avoid penalties, say Thomas Petrides and Charlie Wang at Vedder Price.

  • AI For Advancing Diversity In The Workplace: Friend Or Foe?

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    In the wake of calls for increased workplace diversity, employers are turning to artificial intelligence to automate hiring and cut costs to reach environmental, social and governance objectives, but this technology requires human oversight to minimize biases and discrimination, say Consuela Pinto and Dawn Siler-Nixon at FordHarrison.

  • Handbook Hot Topics: Attendance Policies

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    Employee attendance problems are among the most common reasons for disciplinary action and discharge, which is why a clear policy neatly laid out in an employee handbook is necessary to articulate expectations for workers and support an employer's position should any attendance-related disputes arise, says Kara Shea at Butler Snow.