More Employment Coverage

  • July 24, 2024

    11th Circ. Says Nokia Unit Immune From Worker's Negligence Suit

    The Eleventh Circuit on Wednesday declined to revive a suit against Nokia subsidiary SAC Wireless LLC by a worker who was electrocuted and seriously injured while helping remove a crane from a cell tower site in Georgia, ruling that the worker was an employee of a subcontractor, not SAC Wireless.

  • July 24, 2024

    Ex-SAP Exec Settles Whistleblowing Retaliation Suit

    A former executive of software giant SAP has settled his retaliation and age discrimination claims, according to a Wednesday order by a Pennsylvania federal court.

  • July 24, 2024

    Naval Engineers Urge 4th Circ. To Revive No-Poach Suit

    A pair of former naval engineers have urged the Fourth Circuit to revive their proposed class action accusing military shipbuilding contractors and related firms of using secret "no-poach" agreements, saying their suit was wrongly ruled untimely amid a cover-up of the alleged scheme.

  • July 24, 2024

    TikTok Can't Nix Trade Secrets Row By Worker's Ex-Employer

    A California federal judge on Tuesday denied TikTok's motion to toss a trade secrets suit by Beijing Meishe relating to copyrighted source code for video editing, finding Meishe plausibly alleged it found a "striking similarity" between the two companies' object codes after one of its employees quit and joined TikTok.

  • July 24, 2024

    CFPB Warns Of Anti-Whistleblower Risk In NDAs That 'Muzzle'

    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau cautioned Wednesday that banks and other financial firms risk violating federal law if they require their employees to sign broad nondisclosure agreements that don't clearly allow them to talk freely with regulators or law enforcement.

  • July 24, 2024

    Claims By Recruit In NIL Suit Are 'Ambiguous,' Booster Says

    The college football recruit accusing coaches and boosters of fraud over a canceled name, image and likeness deal badly misinterpreted statements and messages that were never intended to be contractual agreements, a University of Florida booster told a Florida federal judge.

  • July 24, 2024

    Newman Facing 2nd Suspension For 'Continuing Misconduct'

    A panel of Federal Circuit judges on Wednesday recommended U.S. Circuit Judge Pauline Newman remain suspended for another year based on her ongoing refusal to cooperate with an investigation into her health, or even acknowledge the court's concerns.

  • July 24, 2024

    Ex-McElroy Deutsch Exec Says Ch. 11 Doesn't Pause Claims

    A former McElroy Deutsch executive told a New Jersey state court that just because her husband — former McElroy Deutsch chief financial officer John Dunlea — has filed for bankruptcy does not mean she needs to pause her claims against the firm for discrimination and retaliation.

  • July 24, 2024

    Baker McKenzie Promotes 2 Attys In Leadership Shake-Up

    Baker McKenzie announced Wednesday that it has promoted the head of its California offices to be the new chair of its North American employment and compensation practice, and elevated a tax attorney to take over as head of its three California offices.

  • July 24, 2024

    Ex-Marijuana Store Worker Settles Retaliation Suit

    An Atlantic City, New Jersey, marijuana dispensary has settled a disability discrimination lawsuit filed by an ex-employee who claimed the business's managers wouldn't turn down the loud music that was triggering her PTSD.

  • July 23, 2024

    Ex-Raytheon Worker Asks High Court To Take Up Firing Suit

    A former employee of defense contractor Raytheon asked the U.S. Supreme Court to reverse his ouster from the company, arguing that the Fifth Circuit's finding that he shouldn't be reinstated set up a circuit split.

  • July 23, 2024

    Ex-Allied World Exec To Change Plea In $1.5M Fraud Case

    Allied World National Insurance's former executive, who pled not guilty to wire fraud charges earlier this year stemming from a $1 million embezzlement scheme, will change his plea next week in Connecticut federal court, according to a minute entry order entered Tuesday.

  • July 23, 2024

    Optum Can Arbitrate Calif. Healthcare Provider's Antitrust Suit

    A California federal judge Tuesday ordered certain Emanate Health entities who signed hospital services and physician agreements with Optum to arbitrate their antitrust suit accusing it of monopolizing a primary care physician market, finding the agreements encompass rules that say issues of arbitrability will be referred to an arbitrator.

  • July 23, 2024

    $680M Allergan FCA Suit Tossed After High Court Revival

    A Maryland federal judge on Tuesday again tossed a False Claims Act suit accusing an Allergan unit of overcharging Medicaid, previously revived by the U.S. Supreme Court, saying a whistleblower still hadn't shown any deliberate wrongdoing by the company.

  • July 23, 2024

    Chancery Spikes Raytheon Stockholder's Derivative Suit

    A shareholder who faulted directors at Raytheon Technologies Corp. for allowing a special committee to change employee compensation plans without first seeking stockholder approval has failed to show how the board of directors did anything wrong, a Delaware vice chancellor ruled Tuesday, dismissing the derivative lawsuit.

  • July 23, 2024

    Wash. Justices Decline 9th Circ. Request in Uber Murder Case

    Washington State's Supreme Court has declined to answer a certified question from the Ninth Circuit over whether Uber Technologies Inc. had a duty to use reasonable care to protect one of its drivers who was murdered in a carjacking.

  • July 23, 2024

    6th Circ. Judge Doubts Cover-Up Part Of Fire Chief's Job

    A Sixth Circuit judge on Tuesday said he found it hard to believe a Michigan mayor could avoid an ex-fire chief's retaliation suit by claiming the chief's refusal to follow a directive to cover up firefighters' alleged misconduct was part of his job description.

  • July 23, 2024

    Philly Judge Won't Block FTC Noncompete Ban

    A Pennsylvania federal judge refused Tuesday to temporarily block the Federal Trade Commission's impending ban on employment noncompete agreements, a victory for commission authority that could be short-lived as the agency awaits a final decision from a Texas federal judge who's already indicated an inclination to stop the regulation.

  • July 23, 2024

    NJ Gov. Gets Partial Win In Ex-Elections Chief's Suit

    A New Jersey state judge has handed Gov. Phil Murphy a partial win over claims from the state's former elections chief alleging that his civil rights were violated, dismissing a claim that former official had a legal right to his job.

  • July 23, 2024

    Chamber Rips Multibillion-Dollar Atty Fee Bid In Musk Pay Suit

    The nation's largest business organization has urged Delaware's Court of Chancery to adopt sweeping curbs to jumbo plaintiff attorney fee awards, declaring a multibillion-dollar fee bid following the cancellation of Tesla CEO Elon Musk's stock-based pay plan "shocks the conscience."

  • July 23, 2024

    Firm Says Rival's Trademark Merely 'Common Spanish Phrase'

    A Houston-based immigration law firm wants claims trimmed in a suit brought by a rival Washington state firm claiming unfair competition and trademark violation, also filing a counterclaim for declaratory judgment that calls the supposed trademark a "common Spanish phrase."

  • July 22, 2024

    Chicago Firm Seeks $2M For Ex-Atty's Alleged Client Poaching

    Chicago firm Loftus & Eisenberg Ltd. has filed suit in Illinois state court accusing a former attorney's new firm of helping the lawyer poach clients by encouraging them to leave with him, even though the new firm couldn't support his practice.

  • July 22, 2024

    Judge Tosses DHS Expert's Defamation Suit Against Fox

    Fox News Network LLC and Fox Corp. on Monday escaped a defamation lawsuit from the onetime head of the Biden administration's ill-fated counter-disinformation agency, with a federal judge in Delaware finding she failed to "plausibly allege" the alleged defamatory statements were untrue.

  • July 22, 2024

    NC State Resolves Cancer Patient's Fight To Test Building

    North Carolina State University and a professor with cancer have ended a dispute over testing a campus building that contains cancer-causing chemicals, with the school telling the state's highest court the parties are ready to move on from that part of the legal dispute.

  • July 22, 2024

    Retooled Conn. Wine Tasting Death Suit Deemed Untimely  

    The estate of a woman killed in a drunk driving crash can't pursue new claims in its suit against the restaurant where she worked because they were filed too late, a Connecticut state court judge has ruled.

Expert Analysis

  • CFTC Action Highlights Necessity Of Whistleblower Carveouts

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission's novel settlement with a trading firm over allegations of manipulating the market and failing to create contract carveouts for employees to freely communicate with investigators serves as a beacon for further enforcement activity from the CFTC and other regulators, say attorneys at Davis Wright.

  • Being A Luthier Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    When I’m not working as an appellate lawyer, I spend my spare time building guitars — a craft known as luthiery — which has helped to enhance the discipline, patience and resilience needed to write better briefs, says Rob Carty at Nichols Brar.

  • Defending Against Aggressive DOL Child Labor Enforcement

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Department of Labor's recent unsuccessful injunction against an Alabama poultry facility highlights both the DOL's continued focus on child labor violations and the guardrails and defenses that employers can raise, say attorneys at Littler.

  • Lead Like 'Ted Lasso' By Embracing Cognitive Diversity

    Author Photo

    The Apple TV+ series “Ted Lasso” aptly illustrates how embracing cognitive diversity can be a winning strategy for teams, providing a useful lesson for law firms, which can benefit significantly from fresh, diverse perspectives and collaborative problem-solving, says Paul Manuele at PR Manuele Consulting.

  • Questions Remain After 3rd Circ.'s NCAA Amateurism Ruling

    Author Photo

    The Third Circuit's recent holding that college athletes can be considered employees under the FLSA adds to the trend of student-athletes obtaining new legal status in collegiate athletics, but leaves key questions unanswered, including how the economics of the decision will be applied, say attorneys at Reed Smith.

  • Biden Policy Gives Employers New Ways To Help Dreamers

    Author Photo

    A new Biden administration immigration policy makes the process more predictable for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals recipients to seek employment visas, and, given uncertainties surrounding DACA’s future, employers should immediately determine which of their employees may be eligible, says Jennifer Kim at Moore & Van Allen.

  • H-2 Visas Offer Humane, Economic Solution To Border Crisis

    Author Photo

    Congress should leverage the H-2 agricultural and temporary worker visa programs to match qualified migrants with employers facing shortages of workers — a nonpolitical solution to a highly divisive humanitarian issue, say Ashley Dees and Jeffrey Joseph at BAL.

  • Now More Than Ever, Lawyers Must Exhibit Professionalism

    Author Photo

    As society becomes increasingly fractured and workplace incivility is on the rise, attorneys must champion professionalism and lead by example, demonstrating how lawyers can respectfully disagree without being disagreeable, says Edward Casmere at Norton Rose.

  • The Show Must Go On: Noncompete Uncertainty In Film, TV

    Author Photo

    The Federal Trade Commission has taken action to ban noncompetes while the entertainment industry is in the midst of a massive shift away from traditional media, so it is important for studio heads and content owners alike to understand the fate of the rule and their options going forward, say Christopher Chatham and Douglas Smith at Manatt.

  • 'Outsourcing' Ruling, 5 Years On: A Warning, Not A Watershed

    Author Photo

    A New York federal court’s 2019 ruling in U.S. v. Connolly, holding that the government improperly outsourced an investigation to Deutsche Bank, has not undercut corporate cooperation incentives as feared — but companies should not completely ignore the lessons of the case, say Temidayo Aganga-Williams and Anna Nabutovsky at Selendy Gay.

  • Serving In The National Guard Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    My ongoing military experience as a judge advocate general in the National Guard has shaped me as a person and a lawyer, teaching me the importance of embracing confidence, balance and teamwork in both my Army and civilian roles, says Danielle Aymond at Baker Donelson.

  • A Midyear Forecast: Tailwinds Expected For Atty Hourly Rates

    Author Photo

    Hourly rates for partners, associates and support staff continued to rise in the first half of this year, and this growth shows no signs of slowing for the rest of 2024 and into next year, driven in part by the return of mergers and acquisitions and the widespread adoption of artificial intelligence, says Chuck Chandler at Valeo Partners.

  • States Should Loosen Law Firm Ownership Restrictions

    Author Photo

    Despite growing buzz, normalized nonlawyer ownership of law firms is a distant prospect, so the legal community should focus first on liberalizing state restrictions on attorney and firm purchases of practices, which would bolster succession planning and improve access to justice, says Michael Di Gennaro at The Law Practice Exchange.