Discrimination

  • May 28, 2024

    How Wash. 'Free Choice' Statute Overlaps With Anti-Bias Law

    A Washington state law aimed at preventing companies from holding mandatory anti-union meetings will take effect in June, and although the statute ostensibly targets labor matters, experts say the law should be on discrimination attorneys' radar due to its prohibitions on employers promoting political and religious views in the workplace.

  • May 28, 2024

    Nursing Co. Strikes Deal To End EEOC Misgendering Probe

    A Washington nursing facility has reached a deal with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission to settle a charge from a worker who said the business sat idle while co-workers repeatedly and intentionally referred to them by the wrong pronouns.

  • May 28, 2024

    Workplace Civil Rights Suit Gets Full Mich. High Court Hearing

    The Michigan Supreme Court has agreed to again consider whether employers can use contracts to limit the ability of aggrieved workers to sue, after hearing mini oral arguments last year, though two justices said they would not have advanced the case. 

  • May 28, 2024

    Jury Says Chemical Co. Owes Fired Worker $400K In ADA Suit

    A South Carolina federal jury said a chemical company should pay a former worker $400,000 for violating the Americans with Disabilities Act by firing her after she took time off to treat a painful foot condition.

  • May 28, 2024

    Littler Brings On Ogletree Pay Equity Leader In NYC

    Employment and labor law giant Littler Mendelson PC announced Tuesday that it has grown its New York team with the addition of a pay transparency law expert and former pay equity practice group co-chair at Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart PC.

  • May 28, 2024

    11th Circ. Revives Ex-Legal Process Worker's Retaliation Suit

    The Eleventh Circuit reopened a former legal services company employee's lawsuit claiming her boss defaced her car because she complained that a Black colleague wasn't assigning work to white process servers, ruling a trial court used the wrong standard to evaluate her retaliation claims.

  • May 28, 2024

    Boston Red Sox Settle Fired Worker's COVID Vax Bias Suit

    The Boston Red Sox settled a suit from a former worker who said she was fired after refusing the COVID-19 vaccine because it conflicted with her Roman Catholic beliefs, according to a filing Tuesday in Florida federal court.

  • May 24, 2024

    NJ Panel Won't Revive Atty's Turnpike Authority Harassment Suit

    A New Jersey state appeals court panel stood by an attorney's loss Friday in his suit claiming the New Jersey Turnpike Authority and its officials held him back from promotions and raises and harassed him based on his military service in the U.S. National Guard.

  • May 24, 2024

    House Lawmakers Want New Hearing With FDIC's Gruenberg

    Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. Chair Martin Gruenberg is scheduled to appear before the U.S. House Financial Services Committee to answer questions about the damning findings of a probe of the FDIC's workplace culture.

  • May 24, 2024

    EEOC Asks DC Circ. To Revive Bias Case Against Union

    A Washington, D.C., federal judge erred by saying a government employee's discrimination suit against her union was essentially an unfair representation suit that belonged before the Federal Labor Relations Authority, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission told the D.C. Circuit on Friday, saying the case belongs in court.

  • May 24, 2024

    Food Co. Neglects Workers' Demographic Data, EEOC Says

    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission said a New Jersey food service distributor failed to collect demographic data about its workforce for several years in a row, telling a New Jersey federal court that civil rights law requires the company to file the reports.

  • May 24, 2024

    Spurning Applicants Over Anti-War Protests Poses Legal Risk

    Several conservative federal judges and company leaders have signaled they're disinclined to hire students who have participated in campus protests over the Israel-Hamas war, a stance that employment law experts said could invite discrimination claims.

  • May 24, 2024

    8th Circ. Revives Ex-Mayo Clinic Workers' COVID Vax Suits

    The Eighth Circuit on Friday reinstated five workers' claims that the Mayo Clinic illegally disregarded their Christian faith by firing them after they refused to get vaccinated against COVID-19 or undergo regular testing, saying a trial court was wrong when it found the workers weren't sincere enough in their beliefs.

  • May 24, 2024

    High Court Ruling Puts Transfer Bias Suit Back On Track

    The Eleventh Circuit on Friday reopened a Black former guidance counselor's lawsuit alleging an Alabama school district forced her into a less prestigious job while letting white colleagues keep their positions, saying a trial court should reconsider tossing the suit based on a recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling.

  • May 24, 2024

    Instant Messages Sink Early Win Bid In BlueCross Vax Case

    A data scientist was denied her request for summary judgment Friday in her lawsuit alleging BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee wrongly fired her for not getting vaccinated against COVID-19 due to religious objections, after a relative's instant messages cast doubt on the sincerity of her beliefs.

  • May 24, 2024

    NY Forecast: School Pushes To Arbitrate Retaliation Case

    On Thursday, a federal judge will consider a Buffalo, New York, Catholic school's bid to compel arbitration of claims brought by a former president who says she was retaliated against after she uncovered financial and academic issues at the school.

  • May 24, 2024

    Applicants Lack Fed. Standing For Wash. Pay Range Lawsuit

    A Washington federal judge sent back to state court a lawsuit alleging an employer violated a new state requirement to include pay ranges in job advertisements, finding that a job listing without pay information does not harm job applicants enough to justify a federal lawsuit.

  • May 24, 2024

    Fla. Agency Urges High Court To Scrutinize Race Bias Loss

    The Florida Department of Juvenile Justice asked the U.S. Supreme Court to hear its challenge to a Black former employee's win in her race bias lawsuit, saying justices need to clarify whether lower courts can diverge from the typical framework when ruling on summary judgment motions.

  • May 24, 2024

    Weinstein Atty Trying To Chill Retrial Testimony, DA Says

    The Manhattan District Attorney's Office has argued that a lawyer for Harvey Weinstein violated ethics rules by publicly accusing one of the movie mogul's alleged rape victims of perjury in an "obvious" attempt to dissuade her from testifying again at an upcoming retrial.

  • May 24, 2024

    EEOC Weekly Recap: Burrows Flags 'Attacks' On DEI

    U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Chair Charlotte Burrows urged people to stand up against threats to anti-discrimination efforts during a New York University School of Law conference, and the agency reached settlement agreements to wrap up bias and retaliation claims. Here's a look back at what happened at the EEOC last week.

  • May 24, 2024

    CBS Says 1st Amendment Dooms White Writer's Bias Suit

    CBS said a California federal judge should toss a straight white male worker's bias suit claiming he was passed over for writer roles in favor of more diverse candidates, arguing that the First Amendment allows it to tap writers based on their identity as a storytelling operation.

  • May 24, 2024

    Calif. Forecast: Del Monte Workers Seek $2M Deal Approval

    In the coming week, attorneys should watch for the potential final approval of a $2 million deal in a wage and hour class action by Del Monte Foods Inc. plant workers. Here's a look at that case and other labor and employment matters on deck in California.

  • May 23, 2024

    DLA Piper Must Share Prior Pregnancy Bias Claims With Court

    A New York federal magistrate judge on Wednesday ordered DLA Piper to let her privately review previous pregnancy discrimination complaints against it as part of discovery in a former attorney's suit, an order that comes after the firm argued the burden of sharing them "far outweighs its likely benefit."

  • May 23, 2024

    Blue States Throw Weight Behind EEOC Pregnant Worker Rule

    U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission regulations that extend the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act's protections to abortion align with the law's intent to cover conditions arising out of pregnancy, almost two dozen Democratic state attorneys general said in an Arkansas federal court filing.

  • May 23, 2024

    Wash. DOT Cuts Deal To Exit EEOC Disability Bias Probe

    The Washington State Department of Transportation will pay $57,577 to put an end to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's investigation into a former worker's claim that he was fired after disclosing he has a disability, the federal bias watchdog announced Thursday. 

Expert Analysis

  • AI's Baked-In Bias: What To Watch Out For

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    The federal AI executive order is a direct acknowledgment of the perils of inherent bias in artificial intelligence systems, and highlights the need for legal professionals to thoroughly vet AI systems, including data and sources, algorithms and AI training methods, and more, say Jonathan Hummel and Jonathan Talcott at Ballard Spahr.

  • 'Miss Manners' Scenarios Holds Job Accommodation Lessons

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    Robin Shea at Constangy looks at the potentially negative legal consequences for employers who follow some advice recently given in the Washington Post's "Miss Manners" column, and offers solutions of her own.

  • How Biden's AI Order Stacks Up Against Calif. And G7 Activity

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    Evaluating the federal AI executive order alongside the California AI executive order and the G7's Hiroshima AI Code of Conduct can offer a more robust picture of key risks and concerns companies should proactively work to mitigate as they build or integrate artificial intelligence tools into their products and services, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Handling Religious Objections To Abortion-Related Job Duties

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    While health care and pharmacy employee religious exemption requests concerning abortion-related procedures or drugs are not new, recent cases demonstrate why employer accommodation considerations should factor in the Title VII standard set forth by the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2023 Groff v. DeJoy ruling, as well as applicable federal, state and local laws, say attorneys at Epstein Becker.

  • Transgender Worker Rights: A Guide For California Employers

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    California employers should know their obligations under overlapping state and federal law to protect the rights of their transgender, nonbinary and gender-nonconforming workers, and implement best practices to avoid discriminating in how they hire and promote, offer medical benefits to, and prevent harassment of these employees, says Michael Guasco at Littler.

  • The Self-Funded Plan's Guide To Gender-Affirming Coverage

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    Self-funded group health plans face complicated legal risks when determining whether to cover gender-affirming health benefits for their transgender participants, so plan sponsors should carefully weigh how federal nondiscrimination laws and state penalties for providing care for trans minors could affect their decision to offer coverage, say Tim Kennedy and Anne Tyler Hall at Hall Benefits Law.

  • In Focus At The EEOC: Eliminating Recruiting, Hiring Barriers

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    While the recruiting and hiring segment of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s recently finalized strategic enforcement plan spotlights the potential discriminatory effects of artificial intelligence, employers should note that it also touches on traditional bias issues such as unlawfully targeted job advertisements and application inaccessibility, say Rachel See and Annette Tyman at Seyfarth.

  • A Look Into The Developing Regulation Of Employer AI

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    Although employers' use of artificial intelligence is still limited, legislators and companies have been ramping up their efforts to regulate its use in the workplace, with employers actively contributing to the ongoing debate, say Gerald Hathaway and Marc-Joseph Gansah at Faegre Drinker.

  • In Focus At The EEOC: Advancing Equal Pay

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    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s recently finalized strategic enforcement plan expresses a renewed commitment to advancing equal pay at a time when employees have unprecedented access to compensation information, highlighting for employers the importance of open communication and ongoing pay equity analyses, say Paul Evans at Baker McKenzie and Christine Hendrickson at Syndio.

  • 2nd Circ. Ruling Clarifies Title VII Claim Standards

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    The Second Circuit's recent opinion in Banks v. General Motors, although it does not break new ground legally, comes at a crucial time when courts are reevaluating standards that apply to Title VII claims of discrimination and provides many useful lessons for practitioners, says Carolyn Wheeler at Katz Banks.

  • In Focus At The EEOC: Preventing Systemic Harassment

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    With the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's recently finalized strategic enforcement plan identifying a renewed commitment to preventing and remedying systemic harassment, employers must ensure that workplace policies address the many complex elements of this pervasive issue — including virtual harassment and workers' intersecting identities, say Ally Coll and Shea Holman at the Purple Method.

  • Cos. Must Reassess Retaliation Risk As 2nd. Circ. Lowers Bar

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    After a recent Second Circuit decision broadened the federal standard for workplace retaliation, employers should reinforce their nondiscrimination and complaint-handling policies to help management anticipate and monitor worker grievances that could give rise to such claims, says Thomas Eron at Bond Schoeneck.

  • An Employer's Guide To EEOC Draft Harassment Guidance

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    Rudy Gomez and Steven Reardon at FordHarrison discuss the most notable aspects of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s recently proposed workplace harassment guidance, examine how it fits into the context of recent enforcement trends, and advise on proactive compliance measures in light of the commission’s first update on the issue in 24 years.