Discrimination

  • June 10, 2024

    Weinstein Calls Accuser 'Brazen Liar' In Calif. Criminal Appeal

    Harvey Weinstein told a California appellate court that prejudicial rulings deprived him of a fair trial in the Golden State, arguing in his opening brief that the jury wrongfully heard evidence of uncharged sex assault offenses but never heard evidence that would have exposed his accuser as a "brazen liar."

  • June 10, 2024

    EEOC Says Auto Co. Got Rid Of Harassment Suit Evidence

    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission told a Michigan federal court Monday that an automotive services company improperly deleted crucial emails, text messages and personnel records related to claims that it fired an employee after she reported that a supervisor was pressuring her for sex.

  • June 10, 2024

    9th Circ. Won't Revive Ex-City Worker's Accommodation Suit

    The Ninth Circuit declined Monday to revive an employee's suit alleging the city he worked for used an argument he had with police officers as a cover-up to fire him because he requested leave to treat a knee injury, ruling that the worker lacked proof of prejudice.

  • June 10, 2024

    6th Circ. Backs CBP Win In Black Worker's Race Bias Suit

    The Sixth Circuit on Monday refused to reinstate a lawsuit a patrol officer brought against the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency alleging he was demoted because he's Black, saying no new trial is needed despite the worker's argument that the lower court wrongly excluded certain evidence.

  • June 10, 2024

    Introducing Law360's Pay Disclosure Law Tracker

    A movement to tackle discriminatory pay gaps has swept the U.S. in recent years as nearly half of states have enacted bans on salary history requests while almost a dozen have issued laws that require employers to share what they're willing to pay for a position. Law360 has created an interactive, nationwide map tracking these salary history bans and pay transparency requirements.

  • June 10, 2024

    2nd Circ. Upholds Toss Of Fired Cop's Race, Sex Bias Suit

    The Second Circuit refused Monday to revive a Black police officer's lawsuit alleging a New York town fired her after she hurt her back while allowing white men to take on light work or retire, finding she was treated the same as colleagues who weren't receiving disability benefits.

  • June 10, 2024

    Jury Says School Workers Owed $950K In COVID Bias Suit

    An Oregon federal jury said six education workers should get a combined $950,000 win in their religious bias suit claiming their school district illegally placed them on indefinite unpaid leave after approving their exemptions to its COVID-19 vaccination mandate.

  • June 10, 2024

    W.Va. Anti-Trans Sports Suit Stayed Amid High Court Bid

    A West Virginia federal judge has temporarily paused a lawsuit from a transgender minor challenging a state law that prohibits biological males from joining girls' teams, arguing it is not in the best interest of taxpayers to proceed while the U.S. Supreme Court weighs whether to take up the case.

  • June 10, 2024

    5th Circ. Upends Dallas School District Win In Age Bias Suit

    The Fifth Circuit reinstated a lawsuit from a Dallas school district worker who said she was passed over for promotions and fired because she was in her mid-50s, saying a trial court held her to too high a standard when it threw out her lawsuit.

  • June 10, 2024

    Cozen O'Connor Booted From Pa. Equal Pay Case

    Cozen O'Connor has been booted off a Pennsylvania school district's equal-pay lawsuit that was being overseen by a judge with personal ties to the firm, according to an order the judge issued Monday.

  • June 10, 2024

    FordHarrison Makes Associate Hires Across 5 Offices

    FordHarrison LLP announced that it made associate hires across five of the employment law firm's office locations including Los Angeles and Washington, D.C.

  • June 10, 2024

    Duane Morris Rehires Employment Partner From Cooley

    A labor and employment attorney who spent nearly two decades at Duane Morris LLP has rejoined the firm after working at Cooley LLP the past few years.

  • June 10, 2024

    Live Urgent Care In-House Atty Axed For Pregnancy, Suit Says

    A former in-house attorney and compliance officer for Live Urgent Care LLC alleged in New Jersey state court on Friday that she was fired in retaliation for asking to take maternity leave and demanding a bonus she claims was never paid.

  • June 10, 2024

    Order Trims Cuomo Suit Over Harassment Probe Documents

    A New York state judge has partially dismissed a petition brought by former Gov. Andrew Cuomo seeking dozens of unredacted transcripts of witness interviews as part of the state attorney general's sexual harassment investigation that led to his 2021 resignation.

  • June 10, 2024

    EEOC Settles 2 Suits Over Late Demographic Data Reports

    A Georgia chicken processor and a New Jersey food distributor are the latest businesses to settle suits with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission after it targeted 15 companies for failing to submit mandatory workforce demographic reports to the government, according to Monday court filings.

  • June 10, 2024

    Treasury Dept. Beats IRS Agent's Religious Bias Suit

    The U.S. Department of the Treasury defeated an Internal Revenue Service agent's suit claiming he was disciplined for a three-day celebration of Easter mandated by his Christian faith, with a Florida federal judge finding the reprimand was based on performance rather than religion.

  • June 07, 2024

    Split 9th Circ. Revives LA Schools Vaccine Policy Row

    A split Ninth Circuit panel on Friday reversed a California federal court's dismissal of a proposed class action challenging a recently rescinded Los Angeles Unified School District policy requiring employees to get the COVID-19 vaccine to keep their jobs, ruling that the district still has the potential to reinstate it.

  • June 07, 2024

    Hospital Dodges Hostile-Workplace Claim In Race Bias Suit

    A federal court trimmed a state-level claim of hostile work environment and two allegations of racial bias from a Black former emergency room doctor at a hospital outside Philadelphia, but said there were enough questions of fact for other parts of her case to move ahead.

  • June 07, 2024

    11th Circ. Passes On Atlanta Court Officer's Bias Battle

    The Eleventh Circuit won't revive a discrimination suit filed by a former security officer in Atlanta's federal courthouse who says he faced homophobic harassment and was assaulted by another officer while on the job, a three-judge panel said Thursday.

  • June 07, 2024

    EEOC Settles 2 More Suits Over Tardy Demographic Data

    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission said Friday it had resolved lawsuits accusing a New Jersey janitorial company and a Wisconsin logistics company of neglecting to report demographic information about their employees for several years.

  • June 07, 2024

    Thomson Reuters Fired Worker For Anti-BLM Posts, Suit Says

    A former Thomson Reuters data scientist says he was fired after complaining about an allegedly racially hostile work environment toward white people, including the removal of his posts criticizing the Black Lives Matter movement from a company message board.

  • June 07, 2024

    John Deere Pays $1.1M To End DOL Hiring Bias Probe

    John Deere has agreed to pay $1.1 million to the U.S. Department of Labor to shutter an investigation alleging the agricultural manufacturing company declined to employ nearly 300 Black and Hispanic workers through systemic hiring discrimination, the agency announced.

  • June 07, 2024

    Southwest Attys Get Pause On 'Punitive' Religious Training

    In finding Friday that an order for several in-house Southwest Airlines attorneys to undergo "religious liberty training' should be permanently placed on hold while an appeal of a flight attendant's Title VII trial win is pending, the Fifth Circuit said the district court had likely exceeded "the scope of the court's civil-contempt authority."

  • June 07, 2024

    Ex-OFCCP Boss Says Politics Obscures Consensus On DEI

    K&L Gates partner and former Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs director Craig Leen told Law360 in an exclusive interview that conservatives and liberals actually hold similar views on workplace diversity, equity and inclusion that are getting lost in a fog of politics.

  • June 07, 2024

    11th Circ. Won't Revive Motorcycle Salesman's Race Bias Suit

    The Eleventh Circuit backed a Georgia motorcycle dealership's defeat of a former employee's suit alleging he was fired because he's Black, finding Friday he failed to connect a white supervisor's alleged racial animus with the Black dealership owner's decision to let him go.

Expert Analysis

  • Justices' Title VII Ruling Requires Greater Employer Vigilance

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Supreme Court’s recent Muldrow v. St. Louis ruling expands the types of employment decisions that can be challenged under Title VII, so employers will need to carefully review decisions that affect a term, condition or privilege of employment, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • 6th Circ. Bias Ruling Shows Job Evaluations Are Key Defense

    Author Photo

    In Wehrly v. Allstate, the Sixth Circuit recently declined to revive a terminated employee’s federal and state religious discrimination and retaliation claims, illustrating that an employer’s strongest defense in such cases is a documented employment evaluation history that justifies an adverse action, says Michael Luchsinger at Segal Mccambridge.

  • Navigating Harassment Complaints From Trans Employees

    Author Photo

    The Eleventh Circuit's recent decision in Copeland v. Georgia Department of Corrections, concerning the harassment of a transgender employee, should serve as a cautionary tale for employers, but there are steps that companies can take to create a more inclusive workplace and mitigate the risks of claims from transgender and nonbinary employees, say Patricia Konopka and Ann Thomas at Stinson.

  • Employer Considerations Before Title IX Rule Goes Into Effect

    Author Photo

    While the U.S. Department of Education's final rule on Title IX is currently published as an unofficial version, institutions and counsel should take immediate action to ensure they are prepared for the new requirements, including protections for LGBTQ+ and pregnant students and employees, before it takes effect in August, say Jeffrey Weimer and Cori Smith at Reed Smith.

  • 5 Employer Actions Now Risky After Justices' Title VII Ruling

    Author Photo

    Last week in Muldrow v. St. Louis, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that harm didn't have to be significant to be considered discriminatory under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, making five common employer actions vulnerable to litigation, say Kellee Kruse and Briana Scholar at The Employment Law Group.

  • Breaking Down EEOC's Final Rule To Implement The PWFA

    Author Photo

    Attorneys at Littler highlight some of the key provisions of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's final rule and interpretive guidance implementing the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act, which is expected to be effective June 18, and departures from the proposed rule issued in August 2023.

  • How To Prepare As Employee Data Reporting Deadlines Near

    Author Photo

    As filing deadlines approach, government contractors and private companies alike should familiarize themselves with recent changes to federal and California employee data reporting requirements and think strategically about registration of affirmative action plans to minimize the risk of being audited, say Christopher Durham and Zev Grumet-Morris at Duane Morris.

  • Address Complainants Before They Become Whistleblowers

    Author Photo

    A New York federal court's dismissal of a whistleblower retaliation claim against HSBC Securities last month indicates that ignored complaints to management combined with financial incentives from regulators create the perfect conditions for a concerned and disgruntled employee to make the jump to federal whistleblower, say attorneys at Cooley.

  • Why Corporate DEI Challenges Increasingly Cite Section 1981

    Author Photo

    As legal challenges to corporate diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives increase in the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling on race-conscious college admissions last year, Section 1981 of the Civil Rights Act is supplanting Title VII as conservative activist groups' weapon of choice, say Mike Delikat and Tierra Piens at Orrick.

  • Inside OMB's Update On Race And Ethnicity Data Collection

    Author Photo

    The Office of Management and Budget's new guidelines for agency collection of data on race and ethnicity reflect societal changes and the concerns of certain demographics, but implementation may be significantly burdensome for agencies and employers, say Joanna Colosimo and Bill Osterndorf at DCI Consulting.

  • New Wash. Laws Employers Should Pay Attention To

    Author Photo

    The Washington Legislature ended its session last month after passing substantial laws that should prompt employers to spring into action — including a broadened equal pay law to cover classes beyond gender, narrowed sick leave payment requirements for construction workers and protections for grocery workers after a merger, say Hannah Ard and Alayna Piwonski at Lane Powell.

  • The Shifting Landscape Of Physician Disciplinary Proceedings

    Author Photo

    Though hospitals have historically been able to terminate doctors' medical staff privileges without fear of court interference, recent case law has demonstrated that the tides are turning, especially when there is evidence of unlawful motivations, say Dylan Newton and Michael Horn at Archer & Greiner.

  • Anti-DEI Complaints Filed With EEOC Carry No Legal Weight

    Author Photo

    Recently filed complaints against several companies' diversity, equity and inclusion programs alleging unlawful discrimination against white people do not require a response from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, and should not stop employers from rooting out ongoing discriminatory practices, says former EEOC general counsel David Lopez.