Connecticut

  • May 21, 2024

    Conn. Law Firm's Trade Secrets Case Likely Moving To Fla.

    A trade secrets lawsuit brought by a Greenwich, Connecticut, law firm against a former independent contractor is poised to move to the Southern District of Florida after a federal judge in Hartford said Tuesday that a new venue appears to be more appropriate.

  • May 21, 2024

    Strategic Hiring Was The New Normal For BigLaw In 2023

    The 400 largest law firms by headcount in the U.S. grew more slowly in 2023 than in the previous two years, while Kirkland & Ellis LLP surpassed the 3,000-attorney threshold, according to the latest Law360 ranking.

  • May 21, 2024

    The Law360 400: Tracking The Largest US Law Firms

    The legal market expanded more tentatively in 2023 than in previous years amid a slowdown in demand for legal services, especially in transactions, an area that has been sluggish but is expected to quicken in the latter half of the coming year.

  • May 21, 2024

    Barrier-Breaking Conn. Chief Justice To Retire In September

    Richard A. Robinson, the first Black state supreme court chief justice in Connecticut history, will retire from the bench effective Sept. 6, Gov. Ned Lamont's office announced Tuesday morning.

  • May 20, 2024

    Lab Says GSK Hid Zantac Cancer Risk From Feds For Decades

    A Connecticut laboratory claims that GlaxoSmithKline defrauded federal health insurance programs for billions by hiding for 40 years that Zantac decomposes into a carcinogen even when just sitting on the shelf, in a lawsuit filed Monday in Pennsylvania federal court.

  • May 20, 2024

    TD Bank Ex-Employees Ordered To Back Off Client Contacts

    TD Bank NA and its subsidiary TD Private Client Wealth LLC scored a temporary restraining order in Connecticut federal court in a suit accusing two former employees of breaking nonsolicitation agreements and enticing $25 million in client assets to move with them to Raymond James Financial Services Inc.

  • May 20, 2024

    DOJ Says Google Ad Tech Case About Coercion, Not Dealing

    The U.S. Department of Justice urged a Virginia federal judge Friday to preserve its case accusing Google of monopolizing key digital advertising technology, arguing the search giant is misconstruing a case that is really about forcing customers to use its ad exchanges, not about who the company does business with.

  • May 20, 2024

    Conn. Retools Bid To Deny Utility Board Member's Pension

    The state of Connecticut on Monday agreed to retool two paragraphs of a complaint seeking to revoke the pension of a Norwich city employee convicted of misusing funds while serving on a public utility board, a move that a state trial court judge hoped would more swiftly adjudicate the dispute.

  • May 20, 2024

    Stanley Black & Decker Nixes $3.8M Factory Equipment Suit

    Stanley Black & Decker Inc. has dropped a $3.8 million lawsuit against a supplier that it accused of providing faulty equipment for a factory in Texas that ultimately shut down, according to a filing in Connecticut federal court.

  • May 20, 2024

    Ex-Conn. Town Atty Sues Over 'False' Ethics Complaint

    Former Newington, Connecticut, town attorney Benjamin Ancona Jr. and other former officials took the Hartford-area suburb to state court claiming the town's assessor and others defamed them in and regarding a now-dismissed ethics complaint that was purportedly loaded with false statements.

  • May 20, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    Delaware was full of drama last week, as proposed changes to the state's corporate law statutes raised eyebrows and a professor's friend-of-the-court brief sparked a very unfriendly public exchange. Delaware's court of equity banged the gavel on pipeline and social media disputes, and shareholders filed new suits alleging insider trading, vote bungling, unfair stock buybacks and merger shenanigans. In case you missed any of it, here's the recap of all the top news last week from Delaware's Chancery Court.

  • May 17, 2024

    Frontier Attacks Ex-CEO's $17M Life Insurance Tax Refund Bid

    Pointing to a 2004 arbitration agreement and criticizing its ex-CEO's compensation, Frontier Communications has asked a Connecticut state court judge to hang up on a call by Leonard Tow to litigate a $17 million demand for reimbursements on life insurance policies.

  • May 17, 2024

    Worker Settles Claims Conn. Museum Fired Her Over DEI Email

    A Hartford art museum and its former curatorial administrator who accused it of firing her for sending an email questioning its diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives came together to jointly dismiss the worker's free speech retaliation suit from Connecticut federal court.

  • May 17, 2024

    Paul Hastings Team Seeks $2.6M In New Kwok Ch. 11 Fees

    With senior attorneys and Chapter 11 trustee Luc A. Despins billing close to $2,000 an hour, Paul Hastings LLP has filed two motions seeking court approval to be paid an additional $2.6 million in fees for work performed on Chinese exile Ho Wan Kwok's bankruptcy in January and February.

  • May 17, 2024

    Insurance Cos. Jointly Drop Policy Language Copyright Suit

    An insurance policy licensing group and an underwriting firm told a Connecticut federal judge Friday that they have agreed to end their dispute with two insurance underwriting competitors they accused of infringing their copyrights by copying certain language from a marine transportation policy and using it without permission.

  • May 17, 2024

    4 Firms Build $2.55B Sale Of Avangrid To Spain's Iberdrola

    Spanish renewable energy company Iberdrola SA and its portfolio company, sustainable energy business Avangrid, on Friday announced that they have reached an agreement for Iberdrola to take Avangrid private by purchasing the remaining issued and outstanding shares it does not already own in a $2.55 billion deal built by four firms.

  • May 17, 2024

    TD Bank Says Ex-Advisers Enticed $25M To Raymond James

    TD Bank NA and its subsidiary TD Private Client Wealth LLC are accusing two former employees of "brazenly" breaking nonsolicitation agreements by moving to Raymond James Financial Services Inc. and enticing $25 million in client assets to come with them.

  • May 16, 2024

    ESPN Workers Drop Religious Bias Suit Over Vaccine Mandate

    Two out of three former ESPN workers who sued the sports media company and its owner, The Walt Disney Co., claiming religious persecution after they were denied exemptions from their workplace's COVID-19 vaccination requirement have dropped their claims, according to a Thursday notice filed in Connecticut federal court.

  • May 16, 2024

    Conn. Justices Snatch Debt Collection Practice Of Law Case

    The Connecticut Supreme Court has opted to hear a case that questions whether the state's banking commissioner or its judicial branch has the power to regulate debt collection activities that occur under the purview of law firms, leapfrogging the case over the state's intermediate appellate court and into the state's highest court.

  • May 16, 2024

    2nd Circ. Backs Win For Big Banks In Forex-Rigging Suit

    The Second Circuit on Thursday backed a ruling in favor of a group of large banks accused of conspiring to manipulate the foreign currency exchange market in euros and dollars, agreeing with a lower court that the plaintiffs hadn't made qualifying transactions or shown how prices were distorted.

  • May 16, 2024

    Weighted Baby Swaddle 'Inherently Dangerous,' Suit Alleges

    A Massachusetts company has been hit with a proposed class action over its allegedly "inherently dangerous" weighted baby blankets and swaddling wraps, a product category suspected in multiple infant deaths and under investigation by the Consumer Product Safety Commission.

  • May 16, 2024

    Conn. Medicaid Fraudster Gets 27 Months Over $1.6M Scheme

    A Connecticut psychologist who pled guilty to filing $1.6 million in false claims to his state's Medicaid system has been sentenced to 27 months in prison, after the government sought 37 months and the fraudster himself had argued for no prison time at all.

  • May 16, 2024

    Ex-Connecticut Budget Official Denies 22 Corruption Charges

    A former Connecticut state budget official and beleaguered attorney who oversaw millions in state school construction funds pled not guilty on Thursday to a host of corruption charges, including that he coerced contractors into paying him kickbacks.

  • May 15, 2024

    Conn. Strip Club Owner Ran 'Brothel,' Hid $5.7M, Feds Say

    The man in charge of a Connecticut strip club and two of his associates operated the business as a brothel, took payments for "commercial sex acts," lied to secure a $150,000 federal COVID-19 relief grant, and hid $5.7 million in income from the IRS, according to a federal indictment unsealed Wednesday.

  • May 15, 2024

    Bolt Financial Cancels $37M In Shares To End CEO Loan Suit

    Bolt Financial Inc. will cancel over $37 million in shares to settle a derivative suit against the company's board of directors that accuses its former CEO of purposely defaulting on a $30 million loan, according to a filing in Delaware's Court of Chancery.

Expert Analysis

  • Exploring An Alternative Model Of Litigation Finance

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    A new model of litigation finance, most aptly described as insurance-backed litigation funding, differs from traditional funding in two key ways, and the process of securing it involves three primary steps, say Bob Koneck, Christopher Le Neve Foster and Richard Butters at Atlantic Global Risk LLC.

  • Airlines Must Prepare For State AG Investigations

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    A recent agreement between the U.S. Department of Transportation and 18 states and territories will allow attorneys general to investigate consumer complaints against commercial passenger airlines — so carriers must be ready for heightened scrutiny and possibly inconsistent enforcement, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Series

    Teaching Yoga Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Being a yoga instructor has helped me develop my confidence and authenticity, as well as stress management and people skills — all of which have crossed over into my career as an attorney, says Laura Gongaware at Clyde & Co.

  • A Vision For Economic Clerkships In The Legal System

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    As courts handle increasingly complex damages analyses involving vast amounts of data, an economic clerkship program — integrating early-career economists into the judicial system — could improve legal outcomes and provide essential training to clerks, say Mona Birjandi at Data for Decisions and Matt Farber at Secretariat.

  • E-Discovery Quarterly: Recent Rulings On Text Message Data

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    Electronically stored information on cellphones, and in particular text messages, can present unique litigation challenges, and recent court decisions demonstrate that counsel must carefully balance what data should be preserved, collected, reviewed and produced, say attorneys at Sidley.

  • Justices Clarify FAA But Leave Behind Important Questions

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision last month in Bissonnette v. LePage firmly shuts the door on any argument that the Federal Arbitration Act's Section 1 exemption is limited to transportation workers whose employers transport goods on behalf of others, but two major issues remain unresolved, say Joshua Wesneski and Crystal Weeks at Weil.

  • Series

    Swimming Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Years of participation in swimming events, especially in the open water, have proven to be ideal preparation for appellate arguments in court — just as you must put your trust in the ocean when competing in a swim event, you must do the same with the judicial process, says John Kulewicz at Vorys.

  • 2nd Circ. Eminent Domain Ruling Empowers Municipalities

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    The Second Circuit's recent decision in Brinkmann v. Town of Southold, finding that a pretextual taking does not violate the Fifth Amendment's takings clause, gives municipalities a powerful tool with which to block unwanted development projects, even in bad faith, say James O'Connor and Benjamin Sugarman at Phillips Lytle.

  • Notable Q1 Updates In Insurance Class Actions

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    Mark Johnson and Mathew Drocton at BakerHostetler discuss notable insurance class action decisions from the first quarter of the year ranging from salvage vehicle titling to rate discrimination based on premium-setting software.

  • Don't Use The Same Template For Every Client Alert

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    As the old marketing adage goes, consistency is key, but law firm style guides need consistency that contemplates variety when it comes to client alert formats, allowing attorneys to tailor alerts to best fit the audience and subject matter, says Jessica Kaplan at Legally Penned.

  • Series

    Walking With My Dog Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Thanks to my dog Birdie, I've learned that carving out an activity different from the practice of law — like daily outdoor walks that allow you to interact with new people — can contribute to professional success by boosting creativity and mental acuity, as well as expanding your social network, says Sarah Petrie at the Massachusetts Attorney General’s Office.

  • Think Like A Lawyer: Follow The Iron Rule Of Trial Logic

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    Many diligent and eager attorneys include every good fact, point and rule in their trial narratives — spurred by the gnawing fear they’ll be second-guessed for leaving something out — but this approach ignores a fundamental principle of successful trial lawyering, says Luke Andrews at Poole Huffman.

  • Court Clerk Error Is No Excuse For A Missed Deadline

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    Two recent Virginia Court of Appeals decisions in which clerical errors led to untimely filings illustrate that court clerks can be wrong about filing deadlines or the date an order was entered, underscoring the importance of doing one's own research on filing requirements, says Juli Porto at Blankingship & Keith.

  • Circuit Split Brews Over Who's A Securities Seller Under Act

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    A Securities Act section that creates private liability for the sale of an unregistered security is rapidly becoming a favored statute for plaintiffs to wield against participants in both the digital asset and traditional securities markets, but the circuit courts have diverged on who may be held liable for these violations, say Jeffrey L. Steinfeld and Daniel Aronsohn at Winston & Strawn.

  • Banks Have Won Syndicated Loan Battle, But Not The War

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    Though the U.S. Supreme Court's recent denial of certiorari in Kirschner v. JPMorgan preserves the status quo that syndicated loans are not securities, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's discomfort suggests that the underlying issues have not been fully resolved, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.

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